Sacrococcygeal

Sacrococcygeal: Definition

What are the sacral vertebrae?

The sacral vertebrae are located near the very bottom of the spinal column. They are located between the lumbar spine and the tailbone, which is also called the coccyx.

The sacrum is shaped like a triangle. Its sacral vertebrae are fused together into one solid bone.

The first three sacral vertebrae come together and form wide bony wings. These are called alae and they connect to the pelvis. Part of the sacral vertebrae helps to form the back section of the pelvic girdle and the sacral vertebrae join the hips at the sacroiliac joints.

Blood vessels and nerves travel through four openings on the right and on the left side of the sacral vertebrae.  The vertebral canal ends in the center of the end of the sacral canal.

A severe traumatic accident or fall can result in a fracture of the sacral vertebrae, but when this area of the spine is healthy, fractures rarely occur. People who have rheumatoid arthritis or a condition that causes loss of bone mass, such as osteoporosis, may develop fatigue fractures or stress fractures to the sacral vertebrae.

Pain in the lower back pain or legs or radiating pain from the back to the leg, known as sciatica, often occurs with injuries to the back where the lower back and sacral vertebra meet (L5 - S1). This is common due to the twisting and stress this area is subjected to during prolonged periods of sitting and during some sports activities.

Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

The sacral vertebrae area in women in shorter and wider in most women than it typically is in men.  Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a condition that causes low back pain that tends to be worse on one side and travels down the thigh to the knee or even the ankle and foot. It is more common in younger and middle-aged women than in men.

The exact cause of sacroiliac joint dysfunction is difficult to determine. The normal movement of the joint between the sacral vertebrae and the ilium may be due to either too little motion in the joint or due to restricted movement of the joint. It is sometimes difficult for physicians to diagnose the problem because the symptoms are sometimes similar to those of a herniated disc. 

Sacrococcygeal Teratomas

What are sacrococcygeal teratomas?
These are tumors that rarely occur and develop at the base of the spine near the coccyx, which is commonly known as the sacrococcygeal area of the spine. Most sacrococcygeal teratomas are non-cancerous, however, the tumors may still grow larger and may need surgical removal. It is rare for sacrococcygeal teratomas to be cancerous at birth and a lot of them may become malignant if not treated early.
Causes of Sacrococcygeal Teratomas
There is no definite cause of sacrococcygeal teratomas. It is found that sacrococcygeal teratomas are germ cell tumors which are cells that develop in the embryo and soon becomes the cells that compose the male and female reproductive system.

Prevalence

Sacrococcygeal teratomas often occur in women than men by a 4:1 ratio. However, the malignancy of tumors is more common in men. Sacrococcygeal teratomas are found to be present between 1 in 70,000 live births. This disease rarely occurs in adults, but most adult cases are due to tumors that were present at birth but was not detected until the individual's adulthood.

The Coccyx

The coccyx, also known as the "tail bone" is a structure in the shape of a triangle at the very end of the sacral vertebral. It is made up of three to five (most often four) small vertebrae that don't resemble other vertebrae. They look like small pieces of solid bone that are joined to each other by fibrous, cartilage-like tissue. The coccyx is joined to the sacral vertebrae by a joint made up of this same type of fibrous, cartilage-like material, and this joint allows for a minimal amount of movement. The vertebrae of the coccyx typically fuse between the ages of 20 and 30.
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Questions & Answers
Q:
What is the best way to treat permanent back and neck pain and stiffness?
A:

Here are some tips:

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep with a cervical pillow

Orthopedic or cervical pillows are made with special contours to support the space beneath the neck and head. They are also more concave for the head and provide more support to the neck.

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep on your back

The best position to lie to sleep is on your back. If you sleep on your stomach or on your side, make sure your pillow is not too thick. It should raise your head no more than 4 to 6 inches. This will keep your neck and head from turning to either side.

Neck Pain Tips: Position your computer screen at eye level

While you are working at a computer, sit comfortably in your chair with your computer in front of you. Close your eyes and then open them. When you open your eyes, you should see the middle of the computer screen. If your gaze is not in the middle of the screen, adjust the height of the screen using items like books.

To keep your head from gradually drifting forward, take frequent breaks to stretch. Getting up to walk around at least once every half-hour is one of the best neck pain tips.

Neck Pain Tips: Use a telephone headset

Never hold a phone between your shoulder and your ear. Use a headset or other hands-free system to talk on the phone and avoid abusing your neck and spine.

Neck Pain Tips: Exercise your neck muscles

One of the best neck pain tips is using the chin tuck. You can do this often throughout the day. In addition to helping strengthen the muscles that hold the head in alignment over the shoulders, it also helps strengthen the scalene and sub-occipital muscles.

Read more tips here: Neck Pain Tips: Sleeping, Posture, Exercising, Hydration & Prevention

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Temed Holdings
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Q:
What is the best treatment for neck pain and shoulder Pain?
A:

One of the best treatment for neck pain and shoulder pain is exercises:

Neck Pain Exercises: Neck Extension

  1. To begin this neck pain exercise, sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place the palm of your hand on the back of your neck, at the base of your head
  4. Apply slight forward pressure with your hand, while resisting the forward motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax
  6. Repeat the neck pain exercises 5-10 times

Neck pain exercises: Side bend

  1. Sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place your left hand, palm down, on the left side of your head (around your ear)
  4. Slightly push your head to the right side with your hand, while resisting the sideways motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax.
  6. Repeat 5-10 times
  7. Repeat the neck pain exercises with the other side.

Neck pain exercises: Neck flexion

  1. Sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place the tips of your fingers on your forehead
  4. Slightly push your head backward with your fingers, while resisting the backward motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax.
  6. Repeat the neck pain exercises 5-10 times

More exercises here: Neck Pain Exercises

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Temed Holdings
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Q:
How do I reduce the shoulder and neck pain?
A:

Here are some tips:

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep with a cervical pillow

Orthopedic or cervical pillows are made with special contours to support the space beneath the neck and head. They are also more concave for the head and provide more support to the neck.

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep on your back

The best position to lie to sleep is on your back. If you sleep on your stomach or on your side, make sure your pillow is not too thick. It should raise your head no more than 4 to 6 inches. This will keep your neck and head from turning to either side.

Neck Pain Tips: Position your computer screen at eye level

While you are working at a computer, sit comfortably in your chair with your computer in front of you. Close your eyes and then open them. When you open your eyes, you should see the middle of the computer screen. If your gaze is not in the middle of the screen, adjust the height of the screen using items like books.

To keep your head from gradually drifting forward, take frequent breaks to stretch. Getting up to walk around at least once every half-hour is one of the best neck pain tips.

Neck Pain Tips: Carry weight evenly

Many people make the mistake of carrying a heavy briefcase or their purse on their shoulder or on one side of their body. Doing this causes strain in the muscles and leads to pain.

Remove non-essentials from your briefcase or purse. Consider using a backpack to evenly distribute the weight across your shoulders. If you choose to carry a purse or backpack, keep your shoulders level while carrying it.

Neck Pain Tips: Maintain a proper posture

The most common posture contributing to neck pain is the “head-and-shoulders-forward” posture. In this position, the neck slopes forward, putting the head in front of the shoulders.

In this position, the head pulls the upper back forward also in a slumped position. This places a strain on the entire spinal column.

More tips here: Neck Pain Tips: Sleeping, Posture, Exercising, Hydration & Prevention

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Temed Holdings
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