Coprectomy

Corpectomy

 

What is a Corpectomy?

A Corpectomy is a surgical procedure that involves removing either only a portion or all of the vertebral body is called a Corpectomy. This operation is usually performed to decompress or remove pressure from the spinal cord and the nerves. Corpectomy is often done in combination with another procedure to remove all or part of a vertebral disc.

Following the removal of a vertebral body, a vertebral fusion is performed to add stability to the spine. Removing a vertebral body creates a gap or space in the spinal column that needs to be filled. To do this, a portion of bone is taken from one of the patient's legs or the pelvis and grafted in. This bone graft will separate the vertebrae that are left on either side of the gap. As the spine heals, the vertebrae will eventually grow together over the bone graft and fuse.

In Corpectomy, the vertebral bodies and the adjacent vertebral discs are removed to alleviate the pressure on the spinal cord, which is causing spinal stenosis and myelopathy. A Corpectomy can also be used to treat fractures, tumors, infections or spinal deformities. The Latin word “corpus” means body and “ectomy” means to remove.

Indication and Procedure

Corpectomy can be performed on any part of the spine, either the cervical spine, thoracic spine, or the lumbar spine. Corpectomy is usually indicated when the cervical disease involves more than just the disc space.

It is often done for multi-level stenosis with spinal cord compression caused by bone spur growth. The approach of corpectomy is similar to discectomy, although a larger and more vertical incision in the neck will often be used to allow more extensive exposure. The surgeon then performs a discectomy at either end of the vertebral body that will be removed.

The posterior longitudinal ligament is often removed to allow access to the cervical canal and to ensure complete removal of the pressure on the spinal cord or its nerve roots. A bone graft is then inserted into the space to allow for a fusion of the bone segments into one long bone. This graft may either be an autograft or an allograft. Alternatively, “cages” made of titanium or synthetic materials may be used as an alternative to bone grafts.

Risks of Corpectomy

Corpectomy is a more extensive procedure and relatively more complex to perform than other spinal operations. The risks and possible complications of the Corpectomy are statistically greater and should always be discussed with the patient prior to the Corpectomy. Some of the complications of Corpectomy may include:

- Nerve root damage

- Permanent damage to the spinal cord

- Bleeding

- Infection

- Graft dislodgement

- Continued pain

- Complications secondary to anesthesia.

The risk of Corpectomy that most spine surgeons worry about the most is the compromise of the spinal cord that can lead to complete or partial quadriplegia or paralysis.

To help manage the risks during a Corpectomy, the spinal cord function is monitored by somatosensory evoked potentials, which generates a small electrical impulse in the arms and legs. It measures the corresponding brain response and records the length of time it takes the signal to reach the brain.

Any marked slowing in the length of time may indicate the compromise of the spinal cord. There is also a slight risk during the removal of the vertebral body that the vertebral artery is injured. This can lead to a cerebrovascular accident or stroke or a life-threatening bleeding.

This risks of Corpectomy are more significant in certain instances of tumor removal or vertebral infections.With these risks involved, Corpectomy is reserved for those patients with significant spinal cord problems.

Post-Operative Care for Corpectomy

Recovery after Corpectomy surgery can be a slow process. Postoperative pain control will be achieved with the use of intravenous or oral pain medication. Rehabilitation therapy for two to three months is usually recommended for Corpectomy. Once pain and inflammation are controlled, active treatments are slowly introduced to help tone and control the muscles that stabilize the neck and the upper back. Full recovery from Corpectomy may be expected to take up to one year.

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Questions & Answers
Q:
What is the best way to treat permanent back and neck pain and stiffness?
A:

Here are some tips:

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep with a cervical pillow

Orthopedic or cervical pillows are made with special contours to support the space beneath the neck and head. They are also more concave for the head and provide more support to the neck.

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep on your back

The best position to lie to sleep is on your back. If you sleep on your stomach or on your side, make sure your pillow is not too thick. It should raise your head no more than 4 to 6 inches. This will keep your neck and head from turning to either side.

Neck Pain Tips: Position your computer screen at eye level

While you are working at a computer, sit comfortably in your chair with your computer in front of you. Close your eyes and then open them. When you open your eyes, you should see the middle of the computer screen. If your gaze is not in the middle of the screen, adjust the height of the screen using items like books.

To keep your head from gradually drifting forward, take frequent breaks to stretch. Getting up to walk around at least once every half-hour is one of the best neck pain tips.

Neck Pain Tips: Use a telephone headset

Never hold a phone between your shoulder and your ear. Use a headset or other hands-free system to talk on the phone and avoid abusing your neck and spine.

Neck Pain Tips: Exercise your neck muscles

One of the best neck pain tips is using the chin tuck. You can do this often throughout the day. In addition to helping strengthen the muscles that hold the head in alignment over the shoulders, it also helps strengthen the scalene and sub-occipital muscles.

Read more tips here: Neck Pain Tips: Sleeping, Posture, Exercising, Hydration & Prevention

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Temed Holdings
4 answers
Q:
What is the best treatment for neck pain and shoulder Pain?
A:

One of the best treatment for neck pain and shoulder pain is exercises:

Neck Pain Exercises: Neck Extension

  1. To begin this neck pain exercise, sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place the palm of your hand on the back of your neck, at the base of your head
  4. Apply slight forward pressure with your hand, while resisting the forward motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax
  6. Repeat the neck pain exercises 5-10 times

Neck pain exercises: Side bend

  1. Sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place your left hand, palm down, on the left side of your head (around your ear)
  4. Slightly push your head to the right side with your hand, while resisting the sideways motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax.
  6. Repeat 5-10 times
  7. Repeat the neck pain exercises with the other side.

Neck pain exercises: Neck flexion

  1. Sit up straight in a chair with your feet flat on the floor.
  2. Looking straight ahead, tuck your chin slightly (starting position)
  3. Place the tips of your fingers on your forehead
  4. Slightly push your head backward with your fingers, while resisting the backward motion of your neck and head
  5. Hold for a count of 5 and return to the starting position and relax.
  6. Repeat the neck pain exercises 5-10 times

More exercises here: Neck Pain Exercises

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Temed Holdings
4 answers
Q:
How do I reduce the shoulder and neck pain?
A:

Here are some tips:

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep with a cervical pillow

Orthopedic or cervical pillows are made with special contours to support the space beneath the neck and head. They are also more concave for the head and provide more support to the neck.

Neck Pain Tips: Sleep on your back

The best position to lie to sleep is on your back. If you sleep on your stomach or on your side, make sure your pillow is not too thick. It should raise your head no more than 4 to 6 inches. This will keep your neck and head from turning to either side.

Neck Pain Tips: Position your computer screen at eye level

While you are working at a computer, sit comfortably in your chair with your computer in front of you. Close your eyes and then open them. When you open your eyes, you should see the middle of the computer screen. If your gaze is not in the middle of the screen, adjust the height of the screen using items like books.

To keep your head from gradually drifting forward, take frequent breaks to stretch. Getting up to walk around at least once every half-hour is one of the best neck pain tips.

Neck Pain Tips: Carry weight evenly

Many people make the mistake of carrying a heavy briefcase or their purse on their shoulder or on one side of their body. Doing this causes strain in the muscles and leads to pain.

Remove non-essentials from your briefcase or purse. Consider using a backpack to evenly distribute the weight across your shoulders. If you choose to carry a purse or backpack, keep your shoulders level while carrying it.

Neck Pain Tips: Maintain a proper posture

The most common posture contributing to neck pain is the “head-and-shoulders-forward” posture. In this position, the neck slopes forward, putting the head in front of the shoulders.

In this position, the head pulls the upper back forward also in a slumped position. This places a strain on the entire spinal column.

More tips here: Neck Pain Tips: Sleeping, Posture, Exercising, Hydration & Prevention

Read more
Temed Holdings
4 answers